Bimadoshka Pucan, Ph.D.

First Peoples Studies and Department of History, Concordia University, CAN

Boozhoo, Ahniin!  Dr. Pucan n'dishnikaas. Saugeen n'doonjibaa. Mshiikan doodem.
Welcome to my world. I pursue Cultural Intellectual Property Rights of the Anishinaabeg of North America. Here, you will be introduced to the beautiful world of the Oral Tradition. Witness technology igniting relationships between organizations, communities and individuals which builds a duty of reciprocity that continues to reverberate and expand.

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TVO@Saugeen

Anishinaabe culture is traditionally passed through generations with songs and stories. But when the Canadian government introduced the Indian Act in 1876 and created residential schools, Indigenous people were barred from practicing their religion and culture, leaving a gap in these oral stories. Southwestern Ontario Hubs journalist Mary Baxter and field producer Jeyan Jeganathan take a look at how audio recordings from 80 years ago are giving voices back to those who were silenced for decades. 

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Research Interests

I pursue an understanding of culture and history through the stories and songs of the Anishinaabeg. Using innovative new technologies, digitization of early audio recordings presents new areas of research for today's woke academics. 

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